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Monarch butterflies
Mayor's Monarch Pledge
Through the National Wildlife Federation’s Mayors' Monarch Pledge, Mayor James Mueller and the City of Pella have committed to create habitat for the monarch butterfly and pollinators, and to educate citizens about how they can make a difference at home and in their community. 

The links below contain information on what you can do to help monarchs in our community. The City of Pella is working towards several goals as well.  Currently underway is the establishment of  a demonstration garden and Monarch Waystation at the Pella Public Library.  We will also work with other groups and organizations to discuss partnerships that will help to support monarch butterfly conservation.







How You Can Help Monarchs
1. Plant milkweed.
Monarch butterflies lay their eggs exclusively on milkweed, and monarch caterpillars only eat milkweed.  The best thing you can do to help monarchs is to plant milkweed in your yard or garden.  There are several species of milkweed native to Iowa.  Milkweed seeds are available at the Pella Public Library.

2. Plant nectar flowers. 
Monarchs feed on a variety of annual and perennial flowers.  See the list of Monarch nectar flowers.  You can help not only monarchs, but other butterflies and pollinators as well, by planting nectar-rich flowers.  

3.  Reduce or eliminate pesticide use.  

Butterflies are insects, so insecticides will kill them.  Use pesticides with care in your yard and garden, or make a commitment to garden without pesticides.

4.  Get involved.
There are numerous organizations devoted to monarch preservation and habitat restoration. 



Additional information
Iowa's Mowing Law for Roadsides

National Wildlife Federation 
Monarch Butterfly

USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
Farm Bill programs and other ways agricultural producers can help butterflies and pollinators.

US Fish and Wildlife 
Save the Monarch Butterfly

Xerces Society Monarch Conservation and Project Milkweed